Frozen Reblogs

Seeing that the movie Frozen has taken over my life, I'm dedicating this blog to all the amazing posts having to do with the movie, mostly Elsanna.
hafanforever:


Interpretations in “Let It Go”

In Frozen, “Let It Go” is the song that really has a lot of interpretations besides those in “Frozen Heart.”
After Elsa accidentally reveals her powers, she runs away from Arendelle and continues to run until she comes to the North Mountain, where she sings the song “Let It Go.” As she begins, she expresses her guilt over everything that just happened, and repeats some of her older lines, such as “Don’t let them in, don’t let them see,” “Be the good girl you always have to be,” and especially “Conceal, don’t feel.” However, Elsa also comes to realize that she is now alone and free for really the first time in her life, away from people whom she believes she will only harm with her abilities. With this in mind, she begins to feel happy and releases her magic how she wants. Now that her secret is out, she no longer has to hide it, and since she is far away from people, she does not care what they will say or think of her (or so she says).
As Elsa begins to release her magic, she is briefly seen recreating Olaf. It is an expression of how hard her isolation from Anna was on her (Elsa). Building the snowman that Anna asked her to do many times over the years is the first voluntary act she performs with her powers (as soon she decides to “let it go”). As Elsa creates Olaf, she sings, “Can’t hold it back anymore,” which reveals how much she really wanted to do this with Anna whenever she was asked. She creates him during a moment of relief, self-empowerment, and newfound freedom, and also out of the cheerful memories of being with Anna before the accident. These, and the sheer intensity of her long-held desire, are likely the reasons why Olaf was brought to life. If so, Elsa’s later surprise when she discovers Olaf is alive may indicate that she never even admitted to herself how just badly she wanted to rekindle her friendship with Anna. Additionally, he represents what she is capable of doing with her powers when she’s not letting her fear and insecurities take over her.
Every time Elsa sings “Let it go,” she is not only singing about releasing her powers after years of repression, but about her own happiness. The more Elsa sings, the happier she becomes, since she can finally be herself, so she fully embraces her powers and uses them to create beauty and wonder. This is shown especially when she creates her magnificent palace made entirely out of ice, and her beautiful, sparkling, crystal blue gown with matching shoes and transparent blue cape. The beauty and size Elsa creates both in and of her new palace clearly represents the happiness and freedom that she has been suppressing for many years, which seemingly causes her fears to vanish. This is also shown with the appearance of her dress. But even more so, Elsa’s feelings and emotions correspond to the way her magic appears, and it also seems that she can make her magic the way she wants it to appear if she uses her imagination and puts her mind right to it.
Since she is finally free, Elsa also discards the three accessories she wore during her coronation because she views them as restraints: her glove, which holds back her magic; her cape, which is purple (the traditional color of royalty) and represents her responsibility and authority over others as the queen; and her tiara, which represents her queenly title. She also pulls down her hair from a tied-up bun to one loose braid, showing that she wants to wear her hair this way. Even more so, Elsa’s transformation to her signature dress very much reminds me of the transformation in Cinderella, when her torn dress is transformed into her beautiful ball gown. That particular moment is what I consider one of the most beautiful and coolest (pun intended! XD) sequences in the entire movie.
Finally, during and after completing the creations of her castle and dress, Elsa rejects her fate as the queen of Arendelle for her own freedom. This is shown when she tosses away her tiara, which is her last restraint item. As the sun rises in the sky (it was still night when Elsa came to the mountain), Elsa walks out to the balcony and sings, “Here I stand in the light of day.” This refers to the fact that she is emerging from darkness (referring to her past repression) and stepping out into the light (referring to how she is starting her new life by being her true self). Once Elsa finishes singing, she magically slams her balcony doors and goes back inside the palace. With this new beginning of her life, she is determined to put the past behind her (another example of her “letting it go” XD), remain in her palace, and never return to Arendelle, no matter what.
As a note, today is my birthday, so this is a gift to myself, since I love Frozen! :D

hafanforever:

Interpretations in “Let It Go”

In Frozen, “Let It Go” is the song that really has a lot of interpretations besides those in “Frozen Heart.”

After Elsa accidentally reveals her powers, she runs away from Arendelle and continues to run until she comes to the North Mountain, where she sings the song “Let It Go.” As she begins, she expresses her guilt over everything that just happened, and repeats some of her older lines, such as “Don’t let them in, don’t let them see,” “Be the good girl you always have to be,” and especially “Conceal, don’t feel.” However, Elsa also comes to realize that she is now alone and free for really the first time in her life, away from people whom she believes she will only harm with her abilities. With this in mind, she begins to feel happy and releases her magic how she wants. Now that her secret is out, she no longer has to hide it, and since she is far away from people, she does not care what they will say or think of her (or so she says).

As Elsa begins to release her magic, she is briefly seen recreating Olaf. It is an expression of how hard her isolation from Anna was on her (Elsa). Building the snowman that Anna asked her to do many times over the years is the first voluntary act she performs with her powers (as soon she decides to “let it go”). As Elsa creates Olaf, she sings, “Can’t hold it back anymore,” which reveals how much she really wanted to do this with Anna whenever she was asked. She creates him during a moment of relief, self-empowerment, and newfound freedom, and also out of the cheerful memories of being with Anna before the accident. These, and the sheer intensity of her long-held desire, are likely the reasons why Olaf was brought to life. If so, Elsa’s later surprise when she discovers Olaf is alive may indicate that she never even admitted to herself how just badly she wanted to rekindle her friendship with Anna. Additionally, he represents what she is capable of doing with her powers when she’s not letting her fear and insecurities take over her.

Every time Elsa sings “Let it go,” she is not only singing about releasing her powers after years of repression, but about her own happiness. The more Elsa sings, the happier she becomes, since she can finally be herself, so she fully embraces her powers and uses them to create beauty and wonder. This is shown especially when she creates her magnificent palace made entirely out of ice, and her beautiful, sparkling, crystal blue gown with matching shoes and transparent blue cape. The beauty and size Elsa creates both in and of her new palace clearly represents the happiness and freedom that she has been suppressing for many years, which seemingly causes her fears to vanish. This is also shown with the appearance of her dress. But even more so, Elsa’s feelings and emotions correspond to the way her magic appears, and it also seems that she can make her magic the way she wants it to appear if she uses her imagination and puts her mind right to it.

Since she is finally free, Elsa also discards the three accessories she wore during her coronation because she views them as restraints: her glove, which holds back her magic; her cape, which is purple (the traditional color of royalty) and represents her responsibility and authority over others as the queen; and her tiara, which represents her queenly title. She also pulls down her hair from a tied-up bun to one loose braid, showing that she wants to wear her hair this way. Even more so, Elsa’s transformation to her signature dress very much reminds me of the transformation in Cinderella, when her torn dress is transformed into her beautiful ball gown. That particular moment is what I consider one of the most beautiful and coolest (pun intended! XD) sequences in the entire movie.

Finally, during and after completing the creations of her castle and dress, Elsa rejects her fate as the queen of Arendelle for her own freedom. This is shown when she tosses away her tiara, which is her last restraint item. As the sun rises in the sky (it was still night when Elsa came to the mountain), Elsa walks out to the balcony and sings, “Here I stand in the light of day.” This refers to the fact that she is emerging from darkness (referring to her past repression) and stepping out into the light (referring to how she is starting her new life by being her true self). Once Elsa finishes singing, she magically slams her balcony doors and goes back inside the palace. With this new beginning of her life, she is determined to put the past behind her (another example of her “letting it go” XD), remain in her palace, and never return to Arendelle, no matter what.

As a note, today is my birthday, so this is a gift to myself, since I love Frozen! :D

hafanforever:

Motif of Doors in Frozen

It’s probably no secret to fans by now that there is a motif of doors shown throughout Frozen. It is expressed in most of the songs by having the word “door” in the lyrics or showing doors being knocked on, opened, or closed, most especially for “Do You Want to Build a Snowman?” and “Love Is An Open Door.” Five of the songs include “door” and “anymore” as a rhyme to each other:

  • In “Do You Want to Build a Snowman,” 5-year-old Anna sings, “I never see you anymore, come out the door.”
  • In “For the First Time in Forever,” Anna sings, “The window is open, so’s that door. I didn’t know they did that anymore.”
  • In “Love is an Open Door,” Hans and Anna sing, “Say goodbye (say goodbye) to the pain of the past. We don’t have to feel it anymore. Love is an open door.”
  • In “Let It Go,” Elsa sings, “Let it go, let it go. Can’t hold it back anymore. Let it go, let it go. Turn away and slam the door.”
  • In “For the First Time in Forever (Reprise),” Anna sings, “Please don’t slam the door, you don’t have to keep your distance anymore.”

Although the film shows many moments of doors opening, closing, or being knocked on, I selected ten of my most favorite moments with doors based on their significance, major or minor.

  1. First gif: Elsa closes the door to her new bedroom right in front of Anna. This begins the separation of the girls, which continues as they grow up. For years, Anna constantly knocks on Elsa’s door, but Elsa never comes out.
  2. Second gif: On her coronation day, Elsa walks over to a set of doors that lead outside to a balcony to look out at the kingdom that is now hers. This represents how she is literally taking a big step with this new change in her life as a ruler.
  3. Third gif: Followed by Hans, just as they sing “door,” Anna opens the doors to an outside tower. Throughout the entire song, they sing how their “romance” is a “door,” or a chance for a new beginning in their lives.
  4. Fourth gif: Right after she accidentally exposes her magic to the guests, Elsa flees outside of the ballroom doors. These are the first set of doors out of which she runs to escape what she has done.
  5. Fifth gif: After singing “Let It Go,” Elsa slams the balcony doors with a wave of her hand and goes back inside. This represents her desire to be alone for the safety of people from her magic.
  6. Sixth gif: Anna enters the barn right after Kristoff finishes singing. This represents her reaching out to Kristoff to help her on her quest, igniting the start of their relationship.
  7. Seventh gif: After hesitating for a few seconds, Anna finally knocks on the door of Elsa’s ice palace. As she hesitated, Olaf took notice, wondering why she didn’t knock. This is one of my favorite moments of the motif because it represents major déjà vu for Anna. Before this, she had knocked on Elsa’s bedroom door many times, never knowing why she was closed off from Elsa’s life. Now that Anna finally understands everything about their past, she wonders if Elsa will remain closed off or finally open up and let Anna help her.
  8. Eighth gif: After dropping Anna off at the castle, Kristoff waits at the gates to see her off completely until they close right in front of him. Before they do, Anna glances back at him. Once they are closed, Kristoff remains for a few more seconds, then he sadly turns around and begins walking away…though Sven stays behind a little longer. I also really like this moment because by now, Kristoff has changed so much since his journey with Anna began. He initially thought she was a spoiled, annoying, helpless princess, but after what has happened to her, he has grown to care about her so much. He waits until she is out of view to make sure she is safe, and he stays behind momentarily because he thinks he might still be able to help her. But then Kristoff just brushes all of it off; Anna already has a fiancé, someone who is above him in status and who is sure to save her. While he has come to love Anna, Kristoff believes that there will always be someone better than him, that he is not good enough for her and never will be.
  9. Ninth gif: After revealing his true colors and plan to take control of Arendelle to Anna, Hans locks the door to the library and leaves her inside to die. This could also be seen as a nod to earlier, when he promised Anna he would never shut her out…rather than do that, he shut her in instead!
  10. Tenth gif: As a reversal to the previous photo, Olaf uses his nose to unlock the library door and finds Anna close to death, so he rushes to create a fire for her.

Special thanks to arendellesnowflake for creating the gifs for me! :D

hafanforever:

Meaning of “Frozen Heart”

All of the songs in Frozen have some symbolic meaning to them, but “Frozen Heart” definitely has a lot of meanings even just from a few words of the lyrics. Being the opening song, "Frozen Heart" seems to describe Elsa and her powers of ice and snow. But if you think more carefully and listen to it several times, it actually appears to be more of a narration and foreshadowing of the entire story. 

The first verse seems to be a description of Elsa’s powers: she was born with them, there is beauty in them (being a wonderful sight to little Anna), but also great danger (from the moment she strikes Anna). These are the two sides of this magic, with “the force” being Elsa herself since she has that power. The lines also seem to refer to Elsa as a person: as she grows up, she becomes a beautiful woman and remains a loving sister to Anna (by staying away to protect Anna), but she also sees herself as a force of destruction to Arendelle. Because of this, Elsa shuts Anna out and represses her magic and true personality out of fear. This makes it seem like she becomes a cold and heartless person, or have the said “frozen heart worth mining”…even though she still loves Anna and longs to be with her again.

The second verse seems to be a message to Anna, telling her that she has to reach out to Elsa. She has to take the risk to go after Elsa after she runs away in order to save her sister from herself. By the time she finds Elsa and her palace, Anna finally understands why Elsa had been distant as they grew up. Seeing the beauty of Elsa’s magic, but also the danger it can create, makes Anna realize that Elsa shut herself out in order to maintain safety for other people. Even after this truth comes out, Anna still loves Elsa and is probably the only person in Arendelle who does not fear her. Furthermore, to get through to Elsa and have her come home, Anna has to split the metaphorical “ice” that grew in Elsa’s “frozen heart” by showing her love. In this case, it is sibling love, and Anna shows just that by sacrificing herself before Hans can kill Elsa. From Anna’s act, which thaws (or “breaks”) her frozen heart, Elsa is able to realize that love is the key to controlling her powers. With love in mind, Elsa breaks the eternal winter curse over Arendelle. It can be said that love is the key because it is the warmest emotion of all and truly prevails over fear.

As the next couple of verses are short, they can all be combined to represent Elsa and her magic. While “Let it go” is a very obvious reference to her signature song, “Watch your step” refers to the fact that has Elsa literally has to watch her steps by watching every single one of her emotions in order to keep her powers in check. And while her powers make her strong at the right times, even physically, if she lets fear, stress, or unhappiness overcome her too much, she can and will lose complete control of her powers and only unleash strong danger. The biggest examples of this are when she freezes all of Arendelle and strikes Anna in her heart.

The last two verses are almost a word-for-word repeat of those at the beginning at the song, with a couple of changes. “There’s beauty and there’s danger here” is most likely another reference to the beauty and danger in Elsa’s powers. Finally, "Beware the frozen heart" could be represented as a warning about Elsa, as well as a foreshadowing (and danger) to when Anna’s heart is struck and frozen by Elsa, but also as the proper closing to the song and introduction to the story.

So while the song seems to be a foreshadowing reference to Elsa and her powers, some of it may also be an allusion to Hans in conjunction with Anna’s remark at the end of the film: “The only frozen heart around here is yours.” This means that “Beware the frozen heart” also acts as a warning of Hans’s true nature. Before this line, the lyrics in the middle of the song can also refer to Hans’s character and Elsa’s powers simultaneously:

  • Beautiful (Hans’s handsome appearance) / (Elsa’s beautiful appearance, the beauty her powers can create)
  • Powerful (Hans’s power over Arendelle, his strong ability to deceive/manipulate) / (The strength of Elsa’s powers)
  • Dangerous (Hans’s dangerous power over manipulation, his attempt to kill Elsa) / (The dangers of Elsa’s magic, including when she freezes Arendelle and nearly kills Anna twice)
  • Cold (Hans’s cold and evil nature) / (Elsa’s seemingly cold demeanor, the natural coldness of her ice and snow)
hafanforever:


Theme of Freezing in Frozen

When you first see Frozen, you might think that its title makes perfect sense, more so than its original title of “The Snow Queen,” the fairy tale upon which it is based. The fact that the film takes place during a cursed, eternal winter helps to fit the title perfectly, but it is more than that. It also refers to the estranged, or “frozen,” relationship between Anna and Elsa, and the “frozen heart” that needs to be thawed.
Basically, the film represents a theme of frozenness, or coldness, in both figurative and literal terms, especially with the theme of the “frozen heart.” In fact, during the film, "frozen heart" is said a total of seven times, four of which are stated in the opening song “Frozen Heart.”
The lyric “This icy force both foul and fair has a frozen heart worth mining.” (this same line is repeated once)
The lyric “And break the frozen heart.”
The closing lyric “Beware the frozen heart.”
Pabbie tells Anna and Kristoff that “Only an act of true love can thaw a frozen heart.”
Olaf later repeats this line, almost word-for-word, after Anna thaws, saying, “An act of true love will thaw a frozen heart.”
When Anna confronts Hans, she says, “The only frozen heart around here is yours.”
It should be noted that all four of the main characters have some sort of “frozen heart” at one time or another during the film, with three of them having one as a way of concealing their true selves or feelings.
Elsa conceals her feelings to try and keep her powers under control. However, this makes her to be appear cold and distant to Anna, when she is truly a very loving person.
A similar description can be said for Kristoff. He acts very tough and rude at first, but is shown to be very selfless and caring.
Hans is quite the opposite of Elsa and Kristoff. Unlike them, he puts on an act of a benevolent and caring prince, when in reality, he is very cruel and ruthless. Thus, his evil nature appropriately makes him the one to truly have the symbolic frozen heart.
Unlike the others, Anna is the only one to have a literal frozen heart, from the moment when Elsa accidentally strikes her in the chest with her ice. Also, Anna is the only person who does not hide her feelings; she is the most emotionally open.
Variations of these two words include:
Anna tells Hans that “She (Elsa) froze my heart.”
Hans tells Elsa that “She (Anna) said that you froze her heart.”
While Anna confronts Hans, who is confused that Anna is alive and well, he says, “But she (Elsa) froze your heart.” (After he says this, she responds with the above said comment about him being the only one with the frozen heart.)
Other times the word “frozen” is said out loud includes:
Elsa sings, “My soul is spiraling in frozen fractals all around.”
Kristoff notices Arendelle’s state, saying, “It’s completely frozen.”
Olaf sings, “When I finally do what frozen things do in summer.”
Among other examples that show or say something ice or frozen-related in the film include the following examples:
Elsa possesses powers to create snow and ice, which, of course, are naturally cold.
After Anna is struck in the head by Elsa, their mother exclaims, “She’s ice cold!”
As she grows up, although she wants to ensure Anna’s safety, Elsa appears to most to be a very cold and distant person.
Kristoff grows up to be an ice harvester, cutting and harvesting ice from the cold mountains, then selling it.
Elsa creates her magnificent ice palace and dress from her magic.
Olaf and Marshmallow are the two living snowmen created by Elsa.
Kristoff, who notices Anna beginning to grow weaker due to the frozen curse on her heart, says, “She’s as cold as ice.”
Hans is revealed to be a cold, calculating, manipulating, and evil prince.
The Duke complains, “It’s getting colder by the minute! If we don’t do something soon, we’ll all freeze to death!”
Elsa escapes imprisonment and starts an even colder, more dangerous storm.
Just as she saves Elsa, the frozen heart curse on Anna takes full effect, causing her to freeze to death by turning into an ice statue.
Elsa realizes that love, being a warm emotion, is stronger than fear, and it allows her to remove the winter curse on Arendelle.

hafanforever:

Theme of Freezing in Frozen

When you first see Frozen, you might think that its title makes perfect sense, more so than its original title of “The Snow Queen,” the fairy tale upon which it is based. The fact that the film takes place during a cursed, eternal winter helps to fit the title perfectly, but it is more than that. It also refers to the estranged, or “frozen,” relationship between Anna and Elsa, and the “frozen heart” that needs to be thawed.

Basically, the film represents a theme of frozenness, or coldness, in both figurative and literal terms, especially with the theme of the “frozen heart.” In fact, during the film, "frozen heart" is said a total of seven times, four of which are stated in the opening song “Frozen Heart.”

  • The lyric “This icy force both foul and fair has a frozen heart worth mining.” (this same line is repeated once)
  • The lyric “And break the frozen heart.”
  • The closing lyric “Beware the frozen heart.”
  • Pabbie tells Anna and Kristoff that “Only an act of true love can thaw a frozen heart.”
  • Olaf later repeats this line, almost word-for-word, after Anna thaws, saying, “An act of true love will thaw a frozen heart.”
  • When Anna confronts Hans, she says, “The only frozen heart around here is yours.”

It should be noted that all four of the main characters have some sort of “frozen heart” at one time or another during the film, with three of them having one as a way of concealing their true selves or feelings.

  • Elsa conceals her feelings to try and keep her powers under control. However, this makes her to be appear cold and distant to Anna, when she is truly a very loving person.
  • A similar description can be said for Kristoff. He acts very tough and rude at first, but is shown to be very selfless and caring.
  • Hans is quite the opposite of Elsa and Kristoff. Unlike them, he puts on an act of a benevolent and caring prince, when in reality, he is very cruel and ruthless. Thus, his evil nature appropriately makes him the one to truly have the symbolic frozen heart.
  • Unlike the others, Anna is the only one to have a literal frozen heart, from the moment when Elsa accidentally strikes her in the chest with her ice. Also, Anna is the only person who does not hide her feelings; she is the most emotionally open.

Variations of these two words include:

  • Anna tells Hans that “She (Elsa) froze my heart.”
  • Hans tells Elsa that “She (Anna) said that you froze her heart.”
  • While Anna confronts Hans, who is confused that Anna is alive and well, he says, “But she (Elsa) froze your heart.” (After he says this, she responds with the above said comment about him being the only one with the frozen heart.)

Other times the word “frozen” is said out loud includes:

  • Elsa sings, “My soul is spiraling in frozen fractals all around.”
  • Kristoff notices Arendelle’s state, saying, “It’s completely frozen.”
  • Olaf sings, “When I finally do what frozen things do in summer.”

Among other examples that show or say something ice or frozen-related in the film include the following examples:

  • Elsa possesses powers to create snow and ice, which, of course, are naturally cold.
  • After Anna is struck in the head by Elsa, their mother exclaims, “She’s ice cold!”
  • As she grows up, although she wants to ensure Anna’s safety, Elsa appears to most to be a very cold and distant person.
  • Kristoff grows up to be an ice harvester, cutting and harvesting ice from the cold mountains, then selling it.
  • Elsa creates her magnificent ice palace and dress from her magic.
  • Olaf and Marshmallow are the two living snowmen created by Elsa.
  • Kristoff, who notices Anna beginning to grow weaker due to the frozen curse on her heart, says, “She’s as cold as ice.”
  • Hans is revealed to be a cold, calculating, manipulating, and evil prince.
  • The Duke complains, “It’s getting colder by the minute! If we don’t do something soon, we’ll all freeze to death!”
  • Elsa escapes imprisonment and starts an even colder, more dangerous storm.
  • Just as she saves Elsa, the frozen heart curse on Anna takes full effect, causing her to freeze to death by turning into an ice statue.
  • Elsa realizes that love, being a warm emotion, is stronger than fear, and it allows her to remove the winter curse on Arendelle.

hafanforever:

Before I saw Frozen, I had done some reading and watching of documentaries about people who have committed atrocious acts, most often murder. Several times, the term "sociopath" was mentioned, and I realized how they were defined as such. After I saw Frozen, I thought that Hans could very well have been classified as a sociopath based on the kind of behavior he displayed, which differs than most Disney villains I have ever seen.

Most often today, “sociopath” is generally not defined itself, but referred to in the definition of antisocial personality disorder. People who have this type of personality disorder generally show violation of or disregard for the rights of other people. Some of the most common traits or behavior patterns of a sociopath include the following:

  • Skilled acting, especially in deception, manipulation, and charm
  • Absence of anxiety and stress
  • Can be highly intelligent and cunning
  • Incapable of feeling guilt or remorse
  • Lack of showing sympathy or empathy for others
  • Pathological lying and getting away with it
  • Incapable of feeling or expressing love

For Hans, he can very well be defined as a sociopath since all of these traits fit him to a “T.” From the moment we meet him, we see just how good of an actor he is. While he is really nothing more than a cold, calculating, and ruthless prince, he hides his true nature so well with how he manipulates and deceives Anna and the people in Arendelle. Hans knows that princes are expected to be polite, noble, respectful, and kind, so he acts like the complete antithesis of himself in order to make others believe he is who he appears to be. Not to mention that his good looks and charisma are part of what make them fall in his favor.

Many of the other listed sociopathic traits tie in with Hans’s manipulative nature. This includes his high level of cunningness and intelligence, particularly in how there are times when he is able to tell huge lies and avoid suspicion completely. Although he most likely endured neglect and ignorance from his family, some stories he told Anna about his past may have been exaggerated, just so he could keep reeling her in. One of Hans’s most notable lies is when he tells the dignitaries that Anna had died at the hands of Elsa and that they managed to marry before she passed. Not one of them seems to suspect gaps that are apparent in this lie, but perhaps they see that he is too full of “grief” to question him, so they just accept it. This example also brings to my attention that sociopaths don’t feel stress or anxiety in the kind of situations where normal people would have them. This means that lying isn’t a problem for them, as is the said example with Hans, and that they most likely plan things very carefully in order to remain under wraps. They don’t feel or cannot comprehend things like most people.

People who are sociopaths do not care about the differences between right and wrong. If they do wrong, they are incapable of feeling guilt and remorse. This also ties into the fact that they do not sympathize with others. With Hans, we see this when he reveals his true self and whole plan to Anna. As he does, he taunts her for having been so easy to deceive, clearly showing no sympathy for her in the fact that she is dying right in front of him. He does this to Elsa as well: before he tries to kill her, he lies to her that she had caused Anna’s death, and it’s clear that he does not feel sorry for her at all. Then when he raises the sword above his head, there is clearly a smile on his face. Does that (and the scene with Anna) moment show him displaying any feelings of shame, regret, or empathy? I think not. These moments also bring out how arrogant and sadistic Hans can be, which can be found among sociopaths, too.

Since sociopaths do not care about right from wrong, they also do not care about anyone but themselves. They never consider the consequences of their actions unless it benefits them or gets them in trouble with the law. They cary out premeditated acts and make efforts to cover their tracks to avoid getting caught as much as possible; this is also effective in their manipulative natures. For Hans, all he wants is to be king, yet to get what he wants, he knows he has to pretend to be someone he isn’t to avoid suspicion and discovery. Since they don’t care about anyone else, sociopaths are incapable of showing or expressing love to others. We see that with Hans, in how he not-so-subtly reveals to Anna that he never loved her when he says, “If only there was someone out there who loved you.” Of course, since Hans is the youngest of thirteen, he was most likely abused and neglected by his brothers and his parents. I don’t think it’s so difficult to believe it, and it would offer a high explanation on why he cannot love himself. If a child feels unloved, that person, as an adult may spend the rest of their lives trying to gain the love and attention that they didn’t get as a child, even if it means engaging in criminal behaviors.

This all sounds like Hans to me. He is a sociopath, plain and simple, but at one time in his life, he wasn’t. I definitely believe that he grew up feeling angry and jealous that many of his brothers got so much more attention than he did, so it most definitely contributed to the villain he is as an adult. I have to disagree if anyone says that he has good in him or is capable of redemption. All of the gif scenes I chose represent his darkest moments when he reveals his true colors:

  • First, he smirks at and breaks Anna by indirectly saying that he never loved her.
  • Secondly, he tells her that he preferred to marry Elsa just because she was heir and an easier ticket to gaining control of the kingdom, revealing that Anna was just a second option in his plan
  • Thirdly, she falls on the floor as he douses the fire, ignoring her plea to stop, and he insults her by saying that she was “dumb” enough to go after Elsa. This is the only time that he outright insults Anna’s intelligence, and yet it’s like he doesn’t need to. He already is mocking her in how he describes that she was part of his plan, since she was so desperate for love that she was easy to deceive.
  • Fourthly, he confidently argues that he has already gotten away with his plan, then he locks the door, preventing her from escaping and leaving her to die on her own (meaning that he tried to indirectly murder her).
  • And of course, as he raises his sword over Elsa, he is clearly smiling wickedly, eager that he is getting away with his lie to kill her and will receive praise once his wicked deed is complete.

And so there you have it on all the reasons as to what makes Hans a sociopath. You can also read this major analysis I wrote about him. Although I can’t say Hans is one of my favorite villains because the acts he does are truly evil, he is definitely one of the best and most complex villains that Disney has ever created, and he is definitely part of why I love Frozen so much. :)